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Killing Eve: Die For Me

Killing Eve: Die For Me

The basis for KILLING EVE, now a major BBC TV series, starring Sandra Oh

As Villanelle returns to face her childhood demons and the Russian winter, Eve finds herself on the run from The Twelve, who want her dead. As the action moves between London and St Petersburg, and Eve and Villanelle finally admit their mutual erotic obsession, the chess game approaches its lethal, unforgettable conclusion.

Codename Villanelle and No Tomorrow, the first two in the Killing Eve series, are out now!

Praise for Killing Eve TV series

‘A dazzling thriller . . . mightily entertaining‘ Guardian

‘Entertaining, clever and darkly comic’ New York Times

(P) 2020 Hodder & Stoughton Limited
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Genre: Fiction & Related Items / Modern & Contemporary Fiction (post C 1945)

On Sale: 23rd April 2020

Price: £21.99

ISBN-13: 9781529351507

Reviews

Enthralling . . . deftly shaped towards an excellent denouement in which both women revolt against their male bosses and the organisations behind them
Sunday Times, Thriller of the Month
Forget the overrated TV series, Luke Jennings's tales of Sapphic slapstick work better on the page and this sequel to Codename Villanelle ignores the events of Phoebe Waller-Bridge's adaptation. Like his remarkable crackpot assassin, Jennings goes his own sweet way. Once again the reader is treated to a banquet of minced spies. The echoes of Ian Fleming and John le Carré are deafening and the ensuing double-crossing and switch-hitting outspoofs them both
Evening Standard
Enthralling . . . deftly shaped towards an excellent denouement in which both women revolt against their male bosses and the organisations behind them
Sunday Times, Thriller of the Month
Forget the overrated TV series, Luke Jennings's tales of Sapphic slapstick work better on the page and this sequel to Codename Villanelle ignores the events of Phoebe Waller-Bridge's adaptation. Like his remarkable crackpot assassin, Jennings goes his own sweet way. Once again the reader is treated to a banquet of minced spies. The echoes of Ian Fleming and John le Carré are deafening and the ensuing double-crossing and switch-hitting outspoofs them both
Evening Standard