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Annie is obese, lonely and hopeful. Armed with self-help books, her cat and a collection of cow-shaped milk jugs, she moves into her new home and sets about getting to know the neighbours, especially the man next door. She ignores her neighbour’s inconvenient girlfriend, but it’s not quite as easy for Annie to dismiss her own past. As Annie’s murky history of violence, secrets and sexual mishaps catches up with her, she cannot see that she has done anything wrong. She’s just doing what any good neighbour would do, after all…

Reviews

An intense and intriguing novel that never quite lets the reader get comfortable. It understands about the fuzzy boundary between the normal and the strange, and weaves them together in a gripping, ever-darkening narrative
Jenny Diski
Who wouldn't kill for a comic gift like Jenn Ashworth's?
<i>Guardian</i
A hugely readable debut novel . . . about the inability to know others and ourselves
<i>Independent</i>
Evokes a damaged mind with the empathy and confidence of Ruth Rendell
<i>The Times</i>
Extremely intense and powerfully intriguing
Waterstone's