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Is it the end of the road… Or just the beginning?

Combining the storytelling powers of Maeve Binchy with her own unique sense of humour and perception, Father Ted‘s Pauline McLynn crafts a sparklingly original novel, The Woman on the Bus. The perfect read for fans of Ruth Hogan’s The Keeper of Lost Things and Matt Haig’s How to Stop Time.

‘This is Pauline McLynn’s fourth novel, and the author is going from strength to strength with every outing. Fizzing with vividly sketched characters, The Woman on the Bus is a skilfully written story’ – Sunday Tribune

It’s a typical Tuesday evening in Kilbrody. Cathy Long is on her way to collect her drunken father from the pub. Ozzy O’Reilly is in the graveyard, watching the Dublin bus through his binoculars. Charlie Finn is pulling pints, when suddenly it hits him: he’s bored. And that’s when the woman from the bus walks through his door and drinks herself into oblivion. Now the whole village wants to know, who is the woman on the bus? The question is, will she tell them?

What readers are saying about The Woman on the Bus:

‘Her best book so far. Full of real characters, real emotions

‘Heartily recommended, can keep you turning page after page. It is worthy of a sequel’

‘A funny yet moving love story set amongst some wonderful scenery

Reviews

Praise for Pauline McLynn: 'Scandal, infidelity, secrets and soufflé are all explored with a healthy dollop of humour
Express
Hilariously funny follow-up to Something for the Weekend. With the perfect balance of humour, adventure and romance, Pauline McLynn makes crafting witty, fast-paced fiction look like a doddle
OK!
A surprisingly gentle, relaxed story... confident, assured
The Times
Packed with cheeky sarcasm and wit
Company
An upbeat, chatty novel
Daily Mail
If this book receives the critical judgement it deserves, it will forever bury the ghost of a demented housekeeper and proclaim the emergence of one of the most interesting Irish writers in years
Sunday Business Post
Funny and snappy...will sit well on a shelf next to such writers as Cathy Kelly, Morag Prunty and Marian Keyes
Sunday Tribune