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Why did he return to Beirut?

Why did Karim leave his wife and children and the life he had built in France to return to a homeland still reeling from civil war?

Was it to answer his brother Nasim’s call to raise a hospital out of the ashes? Was it to kick over the traces of past love affairs? Or to establish the truth behind his father’s death?

Or was it to confront at last the ghost of the man known only as “Sinalcol”, a legendary phantom of the civil war, and a broken mirror of himself?

In Beirut, Karim will learn the fate of old comrades, and face a brother who shares a past as divided as the city itself.
And he will find that peace is only ever fleeting in a war without end.

Reviews

Khoury is a writer of panoramic scope and ambition... the Broken Mirrors is rich with sly ironies, incisive political observations, and a cosmopolitan array of ideas and literary allusions
Azadeh Moaveni, Financial Times
Khoury's capacious and entrancing novel, masterfully translated by the award-winning Humphrey Davies, is an extraordinary achievement
Malcolm Forbes, The National
Take your pick, but either Karim Shammas, who has returned to Beirut from France, or his father, Nasri, are the most memorable philanderers to have graced the pages of a novel bursting through the seams of history since Milan Kundera unveiled Tomas in The Unbearable Lightness of Being . . . What is beautiful and immediate about Khoury's prose in is his depiction of Beirut in The Broken Mirrors: Sinalcol, easily on a par with Pamuk and Istanbul or Marc Pastor and Barcelona
Tom Mooney, Echo