Andrew Michael Hurley - The Loney - Group

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The Loney

'The Book of the Year 2016'

By Andrew Michael Hurley

WINNER OF THE 2015 COSTA FIRST NOVEL AWARD
THE BRITISH BOOK AWARDS BOOK OF THE YEAR 2016
'The Loney is not just good, it's great. It's an amazing piece of fiction' Stephen King

THE SUNDAY TIMES TOP 10 BESTSELLER. WINNER OF THE 2015 COSTA FIRST NOVEL AWARD.
THE BRITISH BOOK AWARDS BOOK OF THE YEAR 2016.

A brilliantly unsettling and atmospheric debut full of unnerving horror - 'The Loney is not just good, it's great. It's an amazing piece of fiction' Stephen King

Two brothers. One mute, the other his lifelong protector.

Year after year, their family visits the same sacred shrine on a desolate strip of coastline known as the Loney, in desperate hope of a cure.

In the long hours of waiting, the boys are left alone. And they cannot resist the causeway revealed with every turn of the treacherous tide, the old house they glimpse at its end . . .

Many years on, Hanny is a grown man no longer in need of his brother's care.

But then the child's body is found.

And the Loney always gives up its secrets, in the end.

'This is a novel of the unsaid, the implied, the barely grasped or understood, crammed with dark holes and blurry spaces that your imagination feels compelled to fill' Observer

'A masterful excursion into terror' The Sunday Times

Biographical Notes

Andrew Michael Hurley has lived in Manchester and London, and is now based in Lancashire, where he teaches English Literature and Creative Writing. He has had two collections of short stories published by Lime Tree Press. The Loney is his first novel - it was first published in October 2014 by Tartarus Press, a tiny independent publisher based in Yorkshire, as a 300-copy limited-edition.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781473619852
  • Publication date: 07 Apr 2016
  • Page count: 368
  • Imprint: John Murray
An amazing piece of fiction — Stephen King
Here is the masterpiece by which Hurley must enter the Guild of the Gothic: it pleases me to think of his name written on some parchment scroll, alongside those of Walpole, Du Maurier, Maturin and Jackson — Guardian
A masterful excursion into terror — Sunday Times
An extraordinarily haunted and haunting novel — Daily Telegraph
This is a novel of the unsaid, the implied, the barely grasped or understood, crammed with dark holes and blurry spaces that your imagination feels compelled to fill — Observer
Written with the skill of a poet — The Times, Books of the Year
An eerie, disturbing read that doesn't let up until its surprise ending — Daily Mail
An unforgettable addition to the ranks of the best British horror — Metro
A haunting and ambiguous novel that will keep you up at night — Daily Express
A tale of suspense that sucks you in and pulls you under. As yarns go, it rips — New Statesman
A masterclass in spinning out tension — Financial Times
A haunting exploration of religion, faith and family. Hurley's evocation of the landscape is bleak and beautiful, while his portrayal of a family slowly imploding is both perceptive and compelling — Sunday Express summer reads
John Murray

Devil's Day

Andrew Michael Hurley
Authors:
Andrew Michael Hurley

Every autumn, John Pentecost returns to the Lancashire farm where he grew up to help gather the sheep from the moors. Generally, very little changes in the Briardale Valley, but this year things are different. His grandfather - known to everyone as the Gaffer - has died and John's new wife, Katherine, is accompanying him for the first time.Every year, the Gaffer would redraw the boundary lines of the village, with pen and paper but also through the remembrance of folk tales, family stories and timeless communal rituals which keep the sheep safe from the Devil. This year, though, the determination of some members of the community to defend those boundary lines has strengthened, and John and Katherine must decide where their loyalties lie, and whether they are prepared to make the sacrifices necessary to join the tribe...Gripping, unsettling and beautifully written, Andrew Michael Hurley's new novel asks how much we owe to tradition, and how far we will go to belong.

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