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"Mr. President"

"Mr. President"

In this startling look at the birth of American government, award-winning author Harlow Giles Unger shows how George Washington transformed the presidency from a ceremonial post into the most powerful office on earth. Washington combined political cunning, daring, and sheer genius to seize ever-widening powers and impose law and order on the young nation while ensuring individual freedom for its citizens.
#Squad Goals

#Squad Goals

Everbody has their own squad, a group of friends who you can rely on.

There’s the sassy one, the brainiac, the hot mess, the dizzy one, the party animal, the compulsive messager, the surrogate mum. Squad Goals celebrates all the facets of friendship, with burning issues for you to debate such as: ‘Which cockatil would you be?” and “Who is the most likely to live to 100 or spend a night in jail?”.

Illustrated throughout by talented artist Ella Kasperowicz, this book is the perfect gift for birthdays, bachelorette parties and graduation.

Chapters include:

Meet the squad – friend archetypes, the friend most likely to…
In squad we trust – what holds friendships together, group chat…
Squad adventures – bachelorette party, hobbies, vacations, city breaks, party time…
Inspirational squads – Mean Girls, Power Rangers, Harry Potter…
#StandOutOnline

#StandOutOnline

‘For everyone who wants to build their online presence, the RIGHT way!’ – Julie Montagu, wellness guru and author of Recharge

The inspirational new book from the author of The Million Dollar Blog — discover how to build an authoritative and authentic personal brand that will change your life.


If you google yourself, what do you see? Do you blend in with the masses or stand out from the crowd? Are you recognised as a thought-leader in your industry? Or are you watching others build their profile and wondering if you are being left behind?

Whether you’re an entrepreneur, executive, expert or an employee, how you present yourself online has a huge impact on your professional reputation. We are lucky to live in a world where everyone now has the power to publish and create micro-fame by putting out content – word by word, post by post, video by video. But how do you grab people’s attention in today’s noisy online world?

Using a combination of technical know-how, insider tips and interviews with prominent online influencers and business owners, entrepreneur and digital strategist Natasha Courtenay-Smith shows how anyone can build a strong personal brand and become the most visible expert in their industry.

#StandOutOnline is the ultimate guide to building a powerful and influential personal brand that will create boundless opportunities for you and your business. Now is the time for you to find your voice and step into the spotlight.

PRAISE FOR #StandOutOnline:

‘All the practical, wise nuggets of advice you need to get started and dig in deep are in the pages of #StandOutOnline’ – Emma Gannon, award-winning blogger and author of Ctrl Alt Delete and The Multi-Hyphen Method

‘Every single budding and established digital entrepreneur needs to read this enlightening book. Unmissable.’ – Vicki Psarias, author of Mumboss and founder of the award-winning blog Honest Mum

#dearcancer: Things to help you through

#dearcancer: Things to help you through

When journalist and broadcaster Victoria Derbyshire was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2015, she made the decision to share her experiences in a series of video diaries in an effort to help demystify cancer treatment. Overwhelmed by the response, Victoria set up a Facebook page inviting people to share their own stories, talk openly about cancer and support one another.

The result is this collection of writing from cancer patients and their loved ones. Whether you have recently been diagnosed with cancer, or a friend or relative has, everyone who has contributed to this ebook has been through the same journey, and hopes you will take strength from these ‘things to help you through’.

From practical tips on managing your treatment and your everyday life with cancer, to advice on understanding and dealing with the emotional rollercoaster that begins with diagnosis, this free resource is packed with hard-won wisdom and insight, at once useful and poignant.

This exclusive collection is published ahead of Victoria Derbyshire’s book, Dear Cancer, Love Victoria: A Mum’s Diary of Hope.
'I Have a Dream'

'I Have a Dream'

I Have a Dream’ is an anthology of history’s most inspiring words and thoughts from history’s greatest leaders from all ages and nations. Each of the 370 quotations is accompanied by an extended annotation that tells the story of the speaker or explains the circumstances that gave rise to the quotation.

Includes: ‘I have the heart of a king, and a king of England, too’ – Queen Elizabeth I (1588); ‘This nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom’ – Abraham Lincoln (1863); ‘Non-violence is the first article of my faith’ – Mohandas Gandhi (1922); ‘Blood, tears, toil and sweat’ – Winston Churchill (1940); ‘Ask not what your country can do for you’ – John F. Kennedy (1961) and ‘I have a dream’ – Martin Luther King (1963).
'Rock and Roll is Life'

'Rock and Roll is Life'

‘Taylor’s magnificent new novel is Spinal Tap for literary types . . . thoroughly entertaining, knowledgeable romp through the fear and loathing of rock’s golden age. Beautifully written and consistently funny, it is also a poignant account of one man’s search for his own identity’ Mail on Sunday

‘A dazzling rollercoaster homage to an era both bacchanalian and oddly innocent’ Guardian

You may remember the Helium Kids. Back in their late ’60s and early ’70s heyday they appeared on Top of the Tops on 27 separate occasions, released five Billboard-certified platinum albums, played sold-out shows at Madison Square Garden and were nearly, but not quite, as big as the Beatles and the Stones.

Three decades later, in the big house on the outskirts of Norwich, Nick Du Pont is looking back on the rollercoaster years he spent as their publicist in a world of licensed excess and lurking tragedy.

What follows is not only the story of a rock band at a formative time in musical history, when America was opening up to English music and huge amounts of money and self-gratification were there for the taking. For the tale is also Nick’s – the life and times of a war-baby born in a Norwich council house, the son of an absconding GI, whose career is a search for some of the advantages that his birth denied him. It is at once a worm’s eye of British pop music’s golden age and a bittersweet personal journey, with cameo appearances from everyone from Elvis and Her Majesty the Queen Mother to Andy Warhol.

Rock and Roll is Life’ is a vastly entertaining, picaresque and touching novel inspired by the excess and trajectories of the great ’60s and ’70s supergroups, and of the tales brought back from the front line by a very special breed of Englishmen who made it big in the States as the alchemists and enablers, as well as the old making way for the new in the era of the baby boomers. At its heart is one man’s adventure, and the poignancy of the special relationships that dominate his life.
'Salem's Lot

'Salem's Lot

‘Turn off the television – in fact, why don’t you turn off all the lights except for the one over your favourite chair? – and we’ll talk about vampires here in the dim. I think I can make you believe in them.’
Stephen King, from the Introduction.

‘Salem’s Lot is a small New England town with the usual quota of gossips, drinkers, weirdos and respectable folk. Of course there are tales of strange happenings – but not more than in any other town its size.

Ben Mears, a moderately successful writer, returns to the Lot to write a novel based on his early years, and to exorcise the terrors that have haunted him since childhood. The event he witnessed in the house now rented by a new resident. A newcomer with a strange allure. A man who causes Ben some unease as things start to happen: a child disappears, a dog is brutally killed – nothing unusual, except the list starts to grow.

Soon surprise will turn to bewilderment, bewilderment to confusion and finally to terror . . .
'Scuse Me While I Kiss the Sky

'Scuse Me While I Kiss the Sky

From the moment that Ike Turner and the Kings of Rhythm conceived ‘Rocket 88’ to the suicide of Nirvana lead singer Kurt Cobain and Lennon’s Anniversary concert, ‘Scuse Me While I Kiss the Sky chronicles 50 moments in history that shaped rock and roll as we know it. The stories of behind the iconic records and recordings, the untimely deaths, landmark live performances, on-screen incidents and all of the most outrageous moments are recounted in this captivating, comprehensive overview of the greatest musical form of the twentieth century.

Paolo Hewitt’s lively and readable text gives us a unique ‘insider’s view’ on each event explaining the background and immediate aftermath to the moment as well as its long term significance and legacy. Each story is accompanied by an ‘at a glance’ box about each artist, their most significant achievements and contribution to rock history. Iconic moments include:
First show of the Beatles at the Cavern; First show of the Rolling Stones at Eel Pie Island; Dylan goes electric at the Newport Folk festival; The Beach Boys’ ‘Good Vibrations’ is the first pop hit to employ electronic sounds; The Ramones debut at the CBGB’s and launch punk-rock; The Sex Pistols singer Johnny Rotten is attacked in a car park by a razor-wielding man incensed by the band’s anti royalty single, God Save The Queen; The Clash’s ‘London Calling’ mixes punk-rock with reggae, ska, funk, blues, etc; The Talking Heads’ Fear Of Music, produced by Brian Eno, fuses new wave and funk, and invents ‘techno-funk’; Sid Vicious and Nancy Spungen die at the Chelsea hotel; Ozzy Osborne bites the head off a bat and urinates on the Alamo; MTV debuts on cable TV with the Buggles’ ‘Video Killed The Radio Star’; Born In the USA is appropriated by Ronald Reagan for his election campaign; Live Aid concert; The Smiths release their infamous Meat Is Murder album; Kurt Cobain dies; Anniversary concert for Lennon at the Beacon theatre in New York 2010.
'Til Death Do Us Part

'Til Death Do Us Part

Calista Langley operates an exclusive ‘introduction’ agency in Victorian London, catering to respectable ladies and gentlemen who find themselves alone in the world. But now, a dangerously obsessed individual has begun sending her trinkets and gifts suitable only for those in deepest mourning – a black mirror, a funeral wreath, a ring set with black jet stone. Each is engraved with her initials.

Desperate for help and fearing that the police will be of no assistance, Calista turns to Trent Hastings, a reclusive author of popular crime novels. Believing that Calista may be taking advantage of his lonely sister, who has become one of her clients, Trent doesn’t trust her. Scarred by his past, he’s learned to keep his emotions at bay, even as an instant attraction threatens his resolve.

But as Trent and Calista comb through files of rejected clients in hopes of identifying her tormentor, it becomes clear that the danger may be coming from Calista’s own secret past – and that only her death will satisfy the stalker…
'Twas the Fight Before Christmas

'Twas the Fight Before Christmas

From the creators of the bestselling parodies We’re Going on a Bar Hunt, The Very Hungover Caterpillar and The Teenager Who Came to Tea.

‘Tis the season to be jolly. But as any modern family knows, ’tis also the season to be micro-managed by your in-laws, guzzle too many sherries, fight over the TV remote, and panic about your internet shopping not arriving on time.

But if you think that’s bad, just wait until you meet the Jones family. Instead of this being their best Christmas ever, this might just be their last – especially if they don’t all pull together to help their surprise guest in his hour of need.

An uproariously funny update of the traditional Christmas Eve classic – that all the family can enjoy.



Praise for The Very Hungover Caterpillar

‘Hilarious and painfully accurate, The Very Hungover Caterpillar is liable to be one of those parodies that becomes more famous than the original’ Independent


Praise for We’re Going on a Bar Hunt

‘. . . a parody that will draw a smile from any parent’ Guardian


Praise for The Teenager Who Came to Tea

‘A hilarious parody of a much-loved children’s book and a perfect read for anyone who remembers the original, or has ever been a teenager or is the parent / grandparent of a teenager today’ gransnet.com
'We Ain't Got No Drink, Pa'

'We Ain't Got No Drink, Pa'

‘We ain’t got no drink, Pa.’
I trembled as I spoke. Then somewhere inside me I found the anger, the courage to answer him back.
‘We don’t have no grog cos you drank it all!’
I knew he was going for me tonight, so I reckoned I might as well go down fighting after all.

Growing up in the slums of 1920s and 30s Bermondsey, Hilda Kemp’s childhood was one of chaos and fear. Every day was battleground, a fight to survive and a fight to be safe.

For Hilda knew what it was to grow up in desperate poverty: to have to scratch around for a penny to buy bread; to feel the seeping cold of a foggy docklands night with only a thin blanket to cover her; to share her filthy mattress with her brothers and sisters, fighting for space while huddling to keep warm. She knew what it was to feel hunger – not the impatient growl of a tummy that has missed a meal; proper hunger, the type that aches in your soul as much as your belly.

The eldest of five children, Hilda was the daughter of a hard drinker and hard hitter as well. A casual dockworker by day, a bare-knuckle fighter by night and a lousy drunk to boot, her pa honed his fists down the Old Kent Road and Blackfriars, and it was Hilda or her ma who bore the brunt of them at home.

This is the powerful and moving memoir of Hilda’s childhood growing up in dark, filthy, crime-ridden Bermondsey; a place where you knew your neighbours, where you kept your eyes down and your ears shut as defence against the gangs at war in the streets. It’s a time when days were spent running wild down the docklands, jumping onto barges and stealing coal, racing through the dank back-streets of east London like water rats, dodging the milk cart or the rag-and-bone man.

And out of this bleak landscape emerges a brave, resilient young girl whose life is a testament to the power of love and good humour. Moving, dazzling and sombre by turns, once opened this brilliant, seductive book will not let you rest.
'We Ain't Got No Drink, Pa': Part 1

'We Ain't Got No Drink, Pa': Part 1

We Ain’t Got No Drink, Pa can either be read as full-length eBook or in 3 serialised eBook-only parts.

This is PART 1 OF 3.


‘We ain’t got no drink, Pa.’

I trembled as I spoke. Then somewhere inside me I found the anger, the courage to answer him back.
‘We don’t have no grog cos you drank it all!’
I knew he was going for me tonight, so I reckoned I might as well go down fighting after all.

Growing up in the slums of 1920s and 30s Bermondsey, Hilda Kemp’s childhood was one of chaos and fear. Every day was battleground, a fight to survive and a fight to be safe.

For Hilda knew what it was to grow up in desperate poverty: to have to scratch around for a penny to buy bread; to feel the seeping cold of a foggy docklands night with only a thin blanket to cover her; to share her filthy mattress with her brothers and sisters, fighting for space while huddling to keep warm. She knew what it was to feel hunger – not the impatient growl of a tummy that has missed a meal; proper hunger, the type that aches in your soul as much as your belly.

The eldest of five children, Hilda was the daughter of a hard drinker and hard hitter as well. A casual dockworker by day, a bare-knuckle fighter by night and a lousy drunk to boot, her pa honed his fists down the Old Kent Road and Blackfriars, and it was Hilda or her ma who bore the brunt of them at home.

This is the powerful and moving memoir of Hilda’s childhood growing up in dark, filthy, crime-ridden Bermondsey; a place where you knew your neighbours, where you kept your eyes down and your ears shut as defence against the gangs at war in the streets. It’s a time when days were spent running wild down the docklands, jumping onto barges and stealing coal, racing through the dank back-streets of east London like water rats, dodging the milk cart or the rag-and-bone man.

And out of this bleak landscape emerges a brave, resilient young girl whose life is a testament to the power of love and good humour. Moving, dazzling and sombre by turns, once opened this brilliant, seductive book will not let you rest.
'We Ain't Got No Drink, Pa': Part 2

'We Ain't Got No Drink, Pa': Part 2

We Ain’t Got No Drink, Pa can either be read as full-length eBook or in 3 serialised eBook-only parts.

This is PART 2 OF 3.


‘We ain’t got no drink, Pa.’
I trembled as I spoke. Then somewhere inside me I found the anger, the courage to answer him back.
‘We don’t have no grog cos you drank it all!’
I knew he was going for me tonight, so I reckoned I might as well go down fighting after all.

Growing up in the slums of 1920s and 30s Bermondsey, Hilda Kemp’s childhood was one of chaos and fear. Every day was battleground, a fight to survive and a fight to be safe.

For Hilda knew what it was to grow up in desperate poverty: to have to scratch around for a penny to buy bread; to feel the seeping cold of a foggy docklands night with only a thin blanket to cover her; to share her filthy mattress with her brothers and sisters, fighting for space while huddling to keep warm. She knew what it was to feel hunger – not the impatient growl of a tummy that has missed a meal; proper hunger, the type that aches in your soul as much as your belly.

The eldest of five children, Hilda was the daughter of a hard drinker and hard hitter as well. A casual dockworker by day, a bare-knuckle fighter by night and a lousy drunk to boot, her pa honed his fists down the Old Kent Road and Blackfriars, and it was Hilda or her ma who bore the brunt of them at home.

This is the powerful and moving memoir of Hilda’s childhood growing up in dark, filthy, crime-ridden Bermondsey; a place where you knew your neighbours, where you kept your eyes down and your ears shut as defence against the gangs at war in the streets. It’s a time when days were spent running wild down the docklands, jumping onto barges and stealing coal, racing through the dank back-streets of east London like water rats, dodging the milk cart or the rag-and-bone man.

And out of this bleak landscape emerges a brave, resilient young girl whose life is a testament to the power of love and good humour. Moving, dazzling and sombre by turns, once opened this brilliant, seductive book will not let you rest.
'We Ain't Got No Drink, Pa': Part 3

'We Ain't Got No Drink, Pa': Part 3

We Ain’t Got No Drink, Pa can either be read as full-length eBook or in 3 serialised eBook-only parts.

This is PART 3 OF 3.


‘We ain’t got no drink, Pa.’
I trembled as I spoke. Then somewhere inside me I found the anger, the courage to answer him back.
‘We don’t have no grog cos you drank it all!’
I knew he was going for me tonight, so I reckoned I might as well go down fighting after all.

Growing up in the slums of 1920s and 30s Bermondsey, Hilda Kemp’s childhood was one of chaos and fear. Every day was battleground, a fight to survive and a fight to be safe.

For Hilda knew what it was to grow up in desperate poverty: to have to scratch around for a penny to buy bread; to feel the seeping cold of a foggy docklands night with only a thin blanket to cover her; to share her filthy mattress with her brothers and sisters, fighting for space while huddling to keep warm. She knew what it was to feel hunger – not the impatient growl of a tummy that has missed a meal; proper hunger, the type that aches in your soul as much as your belly.

The eldest of five children, Hilda was the daughter of a hard drinker and hard hitter as well. A casual dockworker by day, a bare-knuckle fighter by night and a lousy drunk to boot, her pa honed his fists down the Old Kent Road and Blackfriars, and it was Hilda or her ma who bore the brunt of them at home.

This is the powerful and moving memoir of Hilda’s childhood growing up in dark, filthy, crime-ridden Bermondsey; a place where you knew your neighbours, where you kept your eyes down and your ears shut as defence against the gangs at war in the streets. It’s a time when days were spent running wild down the docklands, jumping onto barges and stealing coal, racing through the dank back-streets of east London like water rats, dodging the milk cart or the rag-and-bone man.

And out of this bleak landscape emerges a brave, resilient young girl whose life is a testament to the power of love and good humour. Moving, dazzling and sombre by turns, once opened this brilliant, seductive book will not let you rest.
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