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Billion Dollar Loser

Billion Dollar Loser

‘A satisfying ticktock of the company’s rapid rise and crash, culminating in its disastrous I.P.O. in 2019 and Neumann’s ouster.’ New York Times

The inside story of the rise and fall of WeWork, showing how the excesses of its founder shaped a corporate culture unlike any other.
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In its earliest days, WeWork promised the impossible: to make the workplace cool.

Adam Neumann, an immigrant determined to make his fortune in the United States, landed on the idea of repurposing surplus New York office space for the burgeoning freelance class. Over the course of ten years, WeWork attracted billions of dollars from some of the most sought-after investors in the world, while spending it to build a global real estate empire.

Based on more than two hundred interviews, Billion Dollar Loser chronicles the breakneck speed at which WeWork’s CEO built and grew his company. Culminating in a day-by-day account of the five weeks leading up to WeWork’s botched IPO and Neumann’s dramatic ouster, Reeves Wiedeman exposes the story of the company’s desperate attempt to secure the funding it needed in the final moments of a decade defined by excess.

With incredible access and piercing insight into the company, Billion Dollar Loser tells the full, inside story of WeWork and its CEO Adam Neumann who together came to represent the most audacious, and improbable, rise and fall in business.
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Like John Carreyrou’s Bad Blood and Mike Isaac’s Super Pumped before it, Billion Dollar Loser traces the turmoil at a startup driven by a charismatic, arrogant founder.

‘A frisky dissection of how a rickety real-estate leasing company tricked the world into seeing it as an immensely valuable, society-shifting tech unicorn.’ WIRED
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Genre: Biography & True Stories / Biography: General / Biography: Business & Industry

On Sale: 20th October 2020

Price: £20

ISBN-13: 9781529385069

Reviews

A swift, tragicomic saga of idealism, avarice, and unfettered ambition-as illuminating about WeWork as the past decade of venture-funded grandiosity, and an excellent case study in the power of branding. Reeves Wiedeman has a talent for the artfully deployed, jaw-dropping detail; there seems to be one on every page. Reading this book gave me the sensation of visiting a Potemkin village after a storm: wires dangling, trompe l'oeil flats at a tilt. Batshit, unsettling, and wholly satisfying. -- Anna Wiener, author of Uncanny Valley
A satisfying ticktock of the company's rapid rise and crash, culminating in its disastrous I.P.O. in 2019 and Neumann's ouster. -- New York Times
A frisky dissection of how a rickety real-estate leasing company tricked the world into seeing it as an immensely valuable, society-shifting tech unicorn....Wiedeman arranges the absurd details of their high lives in the C-suite into a pointillist portrait of wild hubris. -- WIRED
In the distant future, when historians recall the geyser of cash that banks and venture capitalists directed to Silicon Valley, they will almost certainly use the catastrophic collapse of WeWork as a cautionary tale. -- Bloomberg
Move over Theranos, there's a new fallen unicorn in town. Wiedeman deftly takes us inside the much-hyped WeWork and its once venerated founder to find out what really happened-and what really went wrong. -- Newsweek
Tragicomic play-by-play of Neumann's misadventures. . . . Wiedeman's finest feat of reporting and double portraiture is his evocation of Neumann's relationship with his financial savior (for a time) Masayoshi Son. . . To delve any further into their relationship would be to give away the plot of Billion Dollar Loser, which, like the most engrossing nonfiction stories, has a plot indeed, one that only reality could contrive. - New York Times Book Review