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Many Rivers to Cross

Many Rivers to Cross

The 26th instalment of the Number One bestselling series

‘The master of the police procedural’ Mail on Sunday
‘The Alan Banks mystery-suspense novels are the best series on the market. Try one and tell me I’m wrong’ Stephen King

***

A skinny young boy is found dead – his body carelessly stuffed into wheelie bin.

Detective Superintendent Alan Banks and his team are called to investigate. Who is the boy, and where did he come from? Was he discarded as rubbish, or left as a warning to someone? He looks Middle Eastern, but no one on the East Side Estate has seen him before.

As the local press seize upon an illegal immigrant angle, and the national media the story of another stabbing, the police are called to investigate a less newsworthy death: a middle-aged heroin addict found dead of an overdose in another estate, scheduled for redevelopment.

Banks finds the threads of each case seem to be connected to the other, and to the dark side of organised crime in Eastvale. Does another thread link to his friend Zelda, who is facing her own dark side?

The truth may be more complex – or much simpler – than it seems . . .

(P)2019 Hodder & Stoughton Limited
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Genre: Fiction & Related Items / Crime & Mystery

On Sale: 19th September 2019

Price: £19.99

ISBN-13: 9781473642485

Reviews

Praise for the DCI Banks series
:
Near, perhaps even at the top of, the British crime writers' league.
Times
The Alan Banks mystery-suspense novels are the best series on the market. Try one and tell me I'm wrong.
Stephen King
This is vintage Banks - a dogged search for truth which never once loses its grip on its hero's intuition and charm.
Daily Mail
The master of the police procedural.
Mail on Sunday
Robinson is prolific, but with each book he manages to ring the changes.
Guardian
Banks' slow but dogged pursuit of murderers and his meditations on the past make him a figure readers feel they know intimately and trust implicitly and, despite moments of darkness, the series warmth makes you feel all's right with the world.
S Magazine
Robinson has a unique knack of revealing to the layman the painstaking and ingenious ways in which the numerous experts who work for the police can wheedle out the most infinitesimal clues surrounding a suspicious death
On Yorkshire Magazine
Robinson also has a way of undercutting the genre's familiarity. With a deceptively unspectacular language, he sets about the process of unsettling the reader.
Independent
Banks is up against people tra?cking, racism, drug dealing and murder, in this un?inchingly tough case. It kicks o? with the discovery of a Middle Eastern boy's body stu?ed in a wheelie bin and twists and shocks from there
Peterborough Telegraph
Nobody can touch Robinson when it comes to scalpel-sharp police procedurals and Many Rivers to Cross is one of his very best.
Sunderland Echo
Many Rivers To Cross is a well-written and suspenseful crime novel that will be welcomed and read by Peter Robinson's many fans, as well as newcomers to the crime series.
Washington Times
Reliable procedural entertainment from a pro's pro, with an ending that guarantees more drama ahead.
Kirkus Reviews
Many Rivers to Cross is an ultra-modern novel. It covers subjects that are brutal and pitiless, and probably not in the experience of a high percentage of its readers, but are very relevant to today's world and perhaps always have been. Robinson's subject matter for his trilogy is easy to regard as being a million miles from our experience, but nevertheless it exists, and it should not exist. Robinson's exposure in a detective book primarily meant to be read for pleasure is a brave move, but works brilliantly well. We have the horror of being involved in the loathing and bestiality of the crimes, and the joy and satisfaction when at least some of them are cornered and their reign of terror has ended. We pay homage to Banks and to Robinson for having pulled this off, and we sleep easier. I look forward to the final book in this brilliant trilogy.
Sandra Callard, On: Yorkshire magazine