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The Last Goodbye

Paperback / ISBN-13: 9781472122100

Price: £9.99

ON SALE: 4th February 2016

Genre: Lifestyle, Sport & Leisure / Humour

Select a format:

ebook
History is written by the winners. It’s the faithful servants, the insiders, the ones who stick around, who can adapt to almost any condition that get to write the official histories. They publish the memoirs, park in the directors’ spots, erect the statues, form the new governments, wipe out the pockets of resistance, recruit the new starters, set the agendas, talk on the documentaries and retrospectives. Yet theirs – the official version – is never the whole story. The quitter’s tale offers a far more compelling, and often a more honest version of history.

The Last Goodbye, Matt Potter collects the pithiest, angriest, most hilarious messages of resignation throughout history, including those whose exits were a springboard to eventual success, such as Steve Jobs, George Orwell and Charlie Sheen.It’s full of self-deception, bloody knives, betrayal, honour, disgrace, disgust, thwarted ambition and shattered hopes, and sometimes a wicked sting in the tail . . .

Reviews

A hilarious history of the resignation letter... Potter examines our fascination with parting shots
Telegraph
Will make you want to quit your job immediately
Buzzfeed
Just magnificent - an alternate history of our time
Monocle
Will leave you slightly applauding or, maybe, looking to the door yourself
Metro
A fascinating and profound look at how quitters shape history
The Current
A cracking read
Daily Politics
The sort of book that makes you think, long after you've put it down
Reverend Richard Coles, <i>BBC Saturday Live</i>
Celebrates the art of the elegant - or explosive - resignation
The Week
A marvellous idea ... Matt Potter has collected some real beauties
Independent
[The resignation letters] have a compelling intensity, overlooked until Matt Potter spotted the human drama in even the most understated examples
The Glasgow Herald