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Child Welfare Policy and Practice – Issues and Lessons Emerging from Current Research explores the implications of recent research for all those concerned with child welfare and social work. It addresses the present concerns as expressed by Government bodies and central Government enquiries regarding the services and policies relating to children in need of care and attention.

The book deals with social care issues that are common within the UK as well as covering specific aspects of Scottish and Irish child welfare. The current areas of concern covered by the contributors include:

the development of children’s service plans

operationalisation of recent child care legislation

management of the transition of young people with disabilities from childhood to adulthood

use of live video links with child witnesses.

The book also discusses the results of a long term, follow-up study of twenty years duration of failure-to-thrive children.

In conclusion the book puts forward recommendations for influencing future policy and practice in child care. It is essential reading for social work students, social work policy-makers, day care and social workers, teachers, doctors, lawyers and psychologists.

Reviews

This is a timely moment for the publication of such a volume; not only has significant political change taken place across the UK, but many of the research studies being reported have taken place subsequent to the implementation of the Children (Scotland) Act 1995 and the Children (Northern Ireland) Order 1995... The value of a comparative perspective is perhaps particularly evident in the chapters describing recent initiatives in policy and practice, including the implementation of children's services plans and looked after children assessment and action records.
Community Care
A central aim of the book is to demonstrate the importance of research evidence in informing practice and policy in respect of children in need. To a very large degree it achieves this aim. Overall this book should be helpful to busy professionals as it provides useful summaries of research.
YoungMinds Magazine