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Meet Creatia, Persisto and Willforce. They are strong, determined and creative, and they represent the strengths that dyslexia can bring to your life. Together they encourage you to use your skills and talents to be confident in what you do – and shrink the villain Mr Dyspicibilia!

This is a fun and interactive resource for grown-ups and children to work through together, with drawing and writing activities and examples to open up helpful discussions and find practical solutions that put the dyslexic child’s self-esteem and self-understanding at the fore. The strategies in the book are brought to life through the three superheroes who help you develop a child’s unique strengths to tackle the everyday challenges they may experience with reading, writing, staying organised or keeping track of the time. The colourful illustrations, cartoons and dialogue encourage children to name their feelings, identify challenges and recognise their own strengths in any situation.

Reviews

I love this book, written by people with first-hand experience of dyslexia. This interactive and colourful book explores challenges faced by dyslexics and positive traits in equal measure. The 'chatty' style and layout will make it easier for young dyslexics to read and enjoy.
Alais Winton, author of 'Diary of a Dyslexic School Kid' and 'Fun Games and Activities for Children with Dyslexia'
Such a useful book, carefully created to keep children with dyslexia engaged, help them stand up for themselves, and work out all the ways they excel.
Margaret Rooke, author of 'Dyslexia is my Superpower (Most of the Time)'
In a well-presented workbook format, Mission Dyslexia combines inspiring messages about the strengths of dyslexia with opportunities for children to identify their own superpowers to defeat dyslexia challenges. Three cartoon superheroes, imaginatively illustrated by a dyslexic cartoonist, form a supportive team for young readers to build up their positives before the villain, Mr. D, is introduced. An incredibly useful resource for all dyslexic children and the grown-ups who support them in their dyslexia journey.
Cathy Magee, chief executive of Dyslexia Scotland