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‘Just call me Bee. Please, please call me that. If you call me Beatrix Daffodil Tulip Chrysanthemum Rose Edwards I shan’t answer you. I am not being rude or unfriendly, or insolent as Mrs Dixon my teacher calls me. I just don’t like my name. Well, would you?’

Bee stumbles through life in her stripy socks with her head in the clouds, doing her very best to keep out of the way of her bickering parents and avoid bendy tap dancing Crystal Kelly – who makes her life a misery. But when Crystal double-dares her to volunteer for a sponsored swim in honour of her great grandmother Beatrix’s memory, Bee can’t back down. Even though she is terrified of water and cannot swim!

Then new boy Moon-Star gallops to Bee’s rescue on his horse and takes her to meet Old Alice, who lives in a beautiful painted wagon. As Bee enters this new world, her life is changed for ever.

Finally she has an ally. Down by the promise tree the new friends make a pact – Moon Star will teach Bee to swim if Bee will teach him to read. They spit on their hands and shake on their vow and a beautiful friendship begins.

‘Fans of Jacqueline Wilson and Elen Caldecott will like this real-world drama … Warm and dreamy with just the right amount of quirk for young readers to identify with if they feel like outsiders.’ Booktrust

Reviews

Another brilliant book from the wonderfully talented Jane Elson
Chrissi Reads
Jane Elson has crafted a truly special story about overcoming fears, dealing with grief and the power of friendship. A wonderfully empathetic and moving read...
Book Lover Jo
I loved this book, the chapter structures, the language, the character development, the figure-of-eight shaped village, and most of all, Bee, as she gains in confidence under the supportive eye of those who show her they care.
Tanya Allsorts
...gripping story with dramatic moments leading to an intense, heart-stopping climax.
Debbie Williams, Primary Times
Warm and dreamy with just the right amount of quirk for young readers to identify with if they feel like outsiders
Book Trust
Fantastically inspirational stuff about friendships and growing up.
Phil May, Read it Daddy
Swimming to the Moon has it all. Cleverly written in first person, characters leap from the pages as real (and wildly imaginative) as can be ... A great story with fine structure, wonderful characters and a warm happy ending.
The School Librarian