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Friends and Enemies

Friends and Enemies

‘Friends and Enemies is an extraordinary read showing unflinching candour from a truly remarkable woman’ Elton John

‘Blistering . . . shockingly candid . . . stiletto-sharp memoir of the year’ Daily Mail

‘Magnetic and magnificent . . . Amiel is superb, furious and, best of all, funny. Say what you like about her – and many have – but the Black Lady can write’ The Times

Barbara Amiel’s long-awaited memoir is shockingly honest, richly detailed and pulls few punches. An instinctive feminist and now a foe of feminism’s political correctness, her own memoirs cover a formidable array of experiences – political, sexual, marital and material. Born in London during the Blitz, the only consistent strain in her early life was a fierce belief in her identity as a Jew even as the Jewish community disowned her and an unquestioned view that women were free to do anything in any arena they chose without any need to win society’s approval. Which she very often did not.

Her rise to the senior rungs of journalism began in Canada after the emigration of her family and continued in the United Kingdom on her return. With four marriages and an assorted number of beaus, some famous, some infamous (some rather young, some rather elderly), she moved through different worlds encountering problems made more intractable on occasion by her own faulty choices. It is a measure of her writing skill that she held down plum jobs for many decades in Canadian and British journalism as well as appearances in U.S. publications ranging from the Wall Street Journal to Vogue.

As a writer of unabashedly libertarian views, she was derided as much for her wardrobe as for her ideas. Pilloried for years in books and television and called every conceivable name by the media, she is philosophical. ‘I love fashion, sex and opera,’ she once told an interviewer, ‘but life would have been easier if my passions had been for train-spotting and stamp collecting.’

Her life has an operatic quality with a wildly diverse cast including Elton John, Henry Kissinger, Anna Wintour, Oscar de la Renta, Princess Diana, Tom Stoppard, Brooke Astor, Ghislaine Maxwell, Ronald Harwood, David Frost and an array of the aristocrats of Manhattan and the stately homes of England. All handled, she writes ‘with my fatal combination of naivete and self-absorption’. The epic battle with the U.S. justice system leading to the trial and imprisonment of her husband Conrad Black (eventually substantially vindicated) became a litmus paper for sorting out friends from those who were quick to judge and brutal in their dismissal.

Friends and Enemies is not a book of vengeance but an attempt to find her own truth: a life that reads like a novel, eloquent, surprising, written with deeply personal candour and utterly un-put-downable.

‘This is undoubtedly the autobiography of the decade. Barbara Amiel’s searing – and sometimes brutal – honesty, both about herself and others, leaves the reader staggered . . . No-one expected a discreet memoir from Barbara Amiel, but few could possibly have imagined that it would be quite this powerfully, dangerously, profoundly self-revelatory’ Andrew Roberts
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Genre: Biography & True Stories / Biography: General / Autobiography: General

On Sale: 13th October 2020

Price: £25

ISBN-13: 9781472134189

Reviews

This is undoubtedly the autobiography of the decade. Barbara Amiel's searing - and sometimes brutal - honesty, both about herself and others, leaves the reader staggered. The fact that she has for decades been the most sexually attractive female public intellectual on either side of the Atlantic, and certainly knew it, got her into extraordinary scrapes which she describes with a political incorrectness that is as refreshing as it will be highly controversial. How one person could have lived so many starkly different lives - bikini model, gangster's moll, first female editor, TV provocateur, multi-married sexual adventuress, proud Zionist, poet's muse, Cold War warrior, titled society hostess, assiduous prison visitor, and more - is truly extraordinary. There is not a hint of self-pity despite endless opportunities for it - including a rape, an abortion, depression, and three divorces - but instead we get many abandoned, laugh-out-loud scenes and witticisms that will live with the reader for a long time. No-one expected a discreet memoir from Barbara Amiel, but few could possibly have imagined that it would be quite this powerfully, dangerously, profoundly self-revelatory
Andrew Roberts
Friends and Enemies is an extraordinary read showing unflinching candour from a truly remarkable woman
Elton John
An observant and unforgiving account of a life that "has always been a precarious mix of gutter and ballroom, of intense work and absolutely unhealthy play". Packed with enough memorable characters, household moves, dinner parties, and jewelry shopping excursions to fill at least three typical memoirs. A celebrity memoir with an uncompromising kick
Kirkus Reviews
Blistering . . . shockingly candid . . . stiletto-sharp memoir of the year
Daily Mail
I could go on reading about her life for ever . . . frank and funny
Jan Moir, Daily Mail
A fabulous tale of sex and high society . . . 608 gloriously indiscreet pages of elegant vitriol
Hilary Rose, The Times
A scorching memoir exposing the cut-throat world of the one per cent
Chantal Clarendon, Daily Telegraph
Amiel is capable of taking one's breath away with her searing frankness, and, from the evidence so far presented, her book is grisly and gripping in almost equal measure . . . an absorbing historical document . . . a salacious read
Simon Kelner, i news
Utterly gripping . . . [Amiel] has raised the bar stratospherically for the celebrity memoir
Carol Midgley, The Times
Extraordinary
Camilla Long, Sunday Times
Full of passion and fury . . . What a woman
Sarah Sands, Mail on Sunday
Magnetic and magnificent . . . Amiel is superb, furious and, best of all, funny. Say what you like about her - and many have - but the Black Lady can write
Quentin Letts, The Times
Frighteningly, hilariously, gob-smackingly honest book . . . whatever you do, read this brilliant book
Anna van Praagh, Evening Standard
Extraordinary . . . jaw-dropping candour . . . a terrific writer
Jewish Chronicle