index

Search Our Books

Book Title

Filter By

Clear all
Our books

Jedburgh Justice and Kentish Fire

By Paul Anthony Jones
Authors:
Paul Anthony Jones
Did you know that Jedburgh Justice is 'executing someone first, then giving them a trial'? Or that Kentish Fire is 'applauding sarcastically to silence your opponents'? From the author of Haggard Hawks and Paltry Poltroons, this is a fascinating collection of curious phrases and expressions from the English language, together with the stories of their etymology and anecdotes about their use in history. Where Haggard Hawks focused on lists of ten words of a particular kind, this collection instead focuses on lists phrases and expressions, also arranged by their quirky and specific origins. The contents will include: 10 PHRASES DERIVED FROM PLACES IN BRITAIN (Jedburgh justice, Kentish fire, Scarborough warning.) 10 PHRASES DERIVED FROM PLACES IN LONDON (A draught on the pump at Aldgate, Kent Street ejectment.) 10 PHRASES DERIVED FROM PLACES IN AMERICA (Hollywood yes, Michigan bankroll, Chicago Overcoat.) 10 LATIN PHRASES USED IN ENGLISH (Quid pro quo, nunc est bibendum.) 10 FRENCH PHRASES USED IN ENGLISH (La vie en rose, C'est la guerre, Revenons à nos moutons.) 10 SHAKESPEAREAN EXPRESSIONS (Gild the lily, Salad days, All that glitters is not gold.) 10 LITERARY EXPRESSIONS (A thing of beauty is a joy forever, Abandon hope all ye who enter here.) 10 PHRASES FROM COMICS & CARTOONS (Keep up with the Joneses, Mutt and Jeff.) 10 PHRASES FROM SONGS (Miss Otis regrets, The birds and the bees, Potato po-tah-to.) 10 WAYS OF SAYING 'WOW' (Great Scott, My stars, Mamma mia.)
  • More

Journalistas

By Naomi Wolf, Eleanor Mills
Authors:
Naomi Wolf, Eleanor Mills
Since their emergence as a journalistic force after the world wars, women have continued to break new ground in newspapers and magazines, redefining the world as we see it as well as the craft as it applied. Many of the pieces in Journalistas feel almost unsettlingly relevant today,the conclusions Emma "Red" Goldman drew in her 1916, "the Social Aspects of Birth Control," Maddy Vegtel's 1930s article about becoming pregnant at forty, and Eleanor Roosevelt's call for greater tolerance after America's race riots in 1943. Many have pushed other limits: Naomi Wolf's Beauty Myth brought feminism to a new generation Helen Fielding's Bridget Jones caused a media revolution: Ruth Picardie's unflinchingly honest column about living with cancer in 1997 brought a wave of British candour and a host of imitators and when two iconic women come face to face, we have at one end, Dorothy Parker on Isadora Duncan (1928), and at the other, Julie Burchill on Margaret Thatcher (2004).

Judgment Calls

By James McDaniel, John Sloop
Authors:
James McDaniel, John Sloop
The concept of judgment has occupied a place of special importance in the tradition of Western thought. In antiquity and especially in the Enlightenment, judgment served as the rubric under which Western thinkers struggled to come to terms with how the world of human concerns is constituted in thought and, perhaps more important, how humans call for timely and appropriate actions. Recently, judgment has again emerged as a highly contestatory site for philosophical, rhetorical, and cultural reflection and inquiry.This book puts into contact a variety of responses to the question of judgment in a postmodern age, seeking out the question of how, once solid ground is pulled out from underneath the position of the judge, one continues to tread" judgment, to meet obligations while remaining afloat.The essays in this edited volume investigate judgment as a rhetorical problem to be discussed philosophically and examines the standards by which judgments are made and can be made in contemporary culture. The essays clarify the links between rhetoric and judgment as they are played out on public and meta-critical levels.
1