Our Authors
John Morris

John Morris was the first professional historian to undertake a comprehensive assessment of the scattered evidence concerning the infant years of England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland, their influence on each other and their relationship with Europe. The Age of Arthur is now the classic account of the British Isles from the fourth to the seventh centuries. Senior Lecturer in Ancient History at University College, London, the late Dr John Morris founded the journal Past and Present in 1952 and was its first editor. He initiated a major new edition of the Doomsday Book and, with A.H.M. Jones, the Prosopography of the Later Roman Empire. His last book, Londinium: London in the Roman Empire, was published in 1982.
Roy Moxham

Roy Moxham is the author of Tea - Addiction Exploitation and Empire (2003), The Great Hedge of India (2001) and The Freelander (1990). Born and brought up in Evesham, Worcestershire, he went out to Africa in 1961 as a tea planter in Nyasaland, later Malawi. He spent 13 years in Eastern Africa before returning to London to set up a gallery of African art. Subsequently, Roy Moxham qualified as a book and paper conservator. After working at Canterbury Cathedral Archives he became Senior Conservator of the University of London Library. Following retirement in 2005 he devotes his energies to writing and giving talks. He spends half his time in London and the other half travelling, principally in India.Reviews:The Great Hedge of India 'Both scholarly and funny - a rare combination. It surprised me and I hugely enjoyed it.' Eric Newby'Moxham has written a parable at once light-handed and melancholy about the cruelty and folly of Empire.' Sunil Khilnani, Financial TimesTea - Addiction, Exploitation and Empire'A very well-written book and enlightening on all aspects of the desirable shrub.' Financial Times'A masterful historical study.' Good Book Guide
Pat Murphy

Pat Murphy (1955 - )Patrice Ann Murphy was born in Washington in 1955, and is an award-winning American science writer and author of science fiction and fantasy novels. Her second novel, The Falling Woman (1986), won the Nebula Award, and she also won a Nebula Award in the same year for her novelette, 'Rachel in Love.' Her short story collection, Points of Departure (1990) won the Philip K. Dick Award, and her 1990 novella, 'Bones', won the World Fantasy Award in 1991. She lives in San Francisco.
Jeremy Musson

Jeremy Musson is an architectural historian and has been Architectural Editor of Country Life for many years. In his work, Jeremy has always been committed to engaging a wider public to the glories of historic buildings and to exploring the influence of ideas about the past and preservation. He has written and edited hundreds of articles on historic country houses, from Garsington Manor to Knebworth House. He also presented Curious House Guest on BBC2 and is the author of two books, including How to Read a Country House. Jeremy is married with two children.