index
Our Authors
R. A. MacAvoy

R. A. MacAvoy (1949 - ) Roberta Ann MacAvoy was born in Ohio in 1949, and has been a full-time writer for almost 30 years. She is a highly acclaimed author of imaginative and original science fiction and fantasy novels. Her debut novel, Tea With The Black Dragon, was shortlisted for the Hugo, Nebula, World Fantasy and Philip K. Dick Awards. The year it was published, 1984, MacAvoy won the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer. Her other works include the Damiano trilogy, The Book Of Kells, Twisting The Rope and the beloved and much-praised Lens Of The World trilogy.
Ken MacLeod

Ken MacLeod graduated with a BSc from Glasgow University in 1976. Following research at Brunel University, he worked in a variety of manual and clerical jobs whilst completing an MPhil thesis. He previously worked as a computer analyst/programmer in Edinburgh, but is now a full-time writer. He is the author of twelve previous novels, five of which have been nominated for the Arthur C. Clarke Award, and two which have won the BSFA Award. Ken MacLeod is married with two grown-up children and lives in West Lothian.
Sarah Maine

Sarah Maine was born in England but grew up partly in Canada before returning to England for university. She studied archaeology and for many years worked in the profession but is now a freelance writer and researcher. Sarah's debut novel The House Between Tides (previously Bhalla Strand 2014) was re-published by Hodder & Stoughton in 2018. Beyond the Wild River (2017) is her second novel and Women of the Dunes will be published in 2018.
Phillip Mann

Phillip Mann (1942 - )Phillip Mann was born in Yorkshire in 1942. he studied English and Drama at Manchester University and later in California. He worked for the New China News Agency in Beijing for two years, but since 1969 has lived principally in New Zealand, where he held the position of Professor of Drama at Victoria University, Wellington, until he retired in 1998. His first novel, The Eye of the Queen was published in 1982 and was followed by seven others including the 'Story of the Gardener' and 'A Land Fit for Heroes' sequences. He has had many plays and stories broadcast on Radio New Zealand, which also adapted his Gardener novels Master of Paxwax and Fall of the Families.
Manyako

Manyako is the illustrator behind the Strike the Blood light novel series.
John Marco

John Marco has worked in various industries including aviation, computers and home security. He now writes full time. He lives on Long Island in the USA.
Erich Maria Remarque

Erich Maria Remarque was born in Osnabruck in 1899. Exiled from Nazi Germany, and deprived of his citizenship, he lived in America and Switzerland. The author of a dozen novels, Remarque died in 1970.
George R.R. Martin

George R.R. Martin published his first story in 1971 and quickly rose to prominence, winning four HUGO and two NEBULA Awards in quick succession before he turned his attention to fantasy with the historical horror novel FEVRE DREAM, now a Fantasy Masterwork. Since then he has won every major award in the fields of fantasy, SF and horror. His magnificent epic saga A Song of Ice and Fire is redefining epic fantasy for a new generation, and is the basis for the hit HBO series GAME OF THRONES. George R.R. Martin lives in New Mexico.Read more at http://sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/martin_george_r_r
Kugane Maruyama

Kugane Maruyama is the author behind the Overlord novel series.
Richard Matheson

Richard Matheson (1926-2013)Richard Matheson was born in 1926. He began publishing SF with his short story 'Born of Man and Woman' which appeared in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction in 1950. I Am Legend was published in 1954 and has been adapted to film three times. Matheson wrote the script for the film The Incredible Shrinking Man, an adaptation of his second SF novel The Shrinking Man (published in 1956). The film won a Hugo award in 1958. He wrote many screenplays (including The Fall of the House of Usher) as well as episodes of The Twilight Zone. He continued to write short stories and novels, some of which formed the basis for film scripts, including Duel, directed by Steven Spielberg in 1971. Further SF short stories were collected in The Shores of Space (1957) and Shock! (1961). His other novels include Hell House (1971) (filmed as The Legend of Hell House in 1973), Bid Time Return (1975), Earthbound (1982) and Journal of the Gun Years (1992). A film of his novel What Dreams May Come (1978) was released in 1998, starring Robin Williams. A collection of his stories from the 1950s and 1960s was released in 1989 as Richard Matheson: Collected Stories. He died in 2013.
Paul McAuley

Paul McAuley (Born 1955)Paul James McAuley was born in Gloucestershire on St George's Day, 1955. He has a Ph.D in Botany and worked as a researcher in biology at various universities, including Oxford and UCLA, and for six years was a lecturer in botany at St Andrews University, before leaving academia to write full time. He started publishing science fiction with the short story "Wagon, Passing" for Asimov's Science Fiction in 1984. His first novel, 400 Billion Stars won the Philip K. Dick Award in 1988, and 1995's Fairyland won the Arthur C. Clarke and John W. Campbell Awards. He has also won the British Fantasy, Sidewise and Theodore Sturgeon Awards. He lives in London.You can find his blog at: http://www.unlikelyworlds.blogspot.com
Anne McCaffrey

Anne McCaffrey was one of the world's leading science fiction writers, and won both the Hugo and Nebula awards. She was brought up in the US and lived in Ireland for many years. She co-authored books with Elizabeth Moon, Jody Lynn Nye, Margaret Ball, Mercedes Lackey and S.M. Stirling. She died in November 2011 at the age of 85.
T. C. McCarthy

T. C. McCarthy earned a PhD from the University of Georgia. He has worked as a patent examiner in complex biotechnology and for the CIA. In addition to being an expert on advanced weapons technologies, he has won Fulbright and Howard Hughes Biomedical Research Fellowships.
Mary McCarthy

Mary McCarthy (1912-1989) was a well-known novelist, critic, journalist and memoirist. Her most famous novel is THE GROUP.
Jack McDevitt

Jack McDevitt is a former naval officer, taxi driver, English teacher, and motivational trainer, and is now a full-time writer. Eleven of his novels have been Nebula finalists, and SEEKER won the award in 2007. In 2015 Jack won the Robert A. Heinlein Award, given an author of outstanding published works in science fiction and technical writings that inspire the human exploration of space. McDevitt was selected as the winner in recognition of his body of work, which includes over 21 novels and 81 short stories.McDevitt lives in Georgia with his wife Maureen.
Ian McDonald

Ian McDonald was born in Manchester in 1960. His family moved to Northern Ireland in 1965. He now lives in Belfast and works in TV production. The author of many previous novels, including the groundbreaking Chaga books set in Africa, Ian McDonald has long been at the cutting edge of SF. RIVER OF GODS won the BSFA award in 2005, BRASYL won in it in 2007 and THE DERVISH HOUSE in 2010.
John Meaney

John Meaney is the author of TO HOLD INFINITY, PARADOX and CONTEXT. TO HOLD INFINITY and PARADOX were on the BSFA shortlists for BEST NOVEL in 1999 and 2001 respectively. THE TIMES called John Meaney 'The first important new sf writer of the 21st century'. Meaney has a degree in physics and computer science, and holds a black belt in Shotokan Karate. He lives in Glamorgan.
Grace Metalious

Grace Metalious was born in a French-Canadian ghetto in New Hampshire in 1924. She wrote three other novels and died of cirrhosis of the liver at age 39.
Robert A. Metzger

Robert A. Metzger (1956 - ) Robert A. Metzger has spent his entire life in the Los Angeles area, including his stint at UCLA where he received a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering, and his current stint at the Hughes Research Laboratories in Malibu where he grows thin film materials for high speed transistors by a process called Molecular Beam Epitaxy. His short stories have appeared in Aboriginal SF and Weird Tales, and he writes a science column called "What If?" which appears in Aboriginal SF. He lives with no cute pets, has no endearing hobbies, and hates yogurt with a passion that most people reserve for axe-murderers. He reads supermarket tabloids, refuses to wash his car, and has managed to convince several people that lettuce is his favourite food.
Gakuto Mikumo

Gakuto Mikumo is the author behind the light novel series Asura Cryin', The Mystic Archives of Dantalian, andStrike the Blood.