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Our Authors
Kinley MacGregor

Writing as Sherrilyn Kenyon and Kinley MacGregor, she is the NEW YORK TIMES bestselling and award-winning author of several series: the Dark-Hunters; the Lords of Avalon; and the League. She lives with her husband and three sons in Nashville, Tennessee.
Tim Mackintosh-Smith

Tim Mackintosh-Smith's first book, YEMEN: TRAVELS IN DICTIONARY LAND won the 1998 Thomas Cook/Daily Telegraph Travel Book Award and is now regarded as a classic of Arabian description. His books on Ibn Battutah's adventures in the old Islamic world and in India have all received huge critical acclaim. LANDFALLS was awarded the Oldie Best Travel Award in 2010 and the Ibn Battutah Prize of Honour by the Arab Centre for Geographical Literature. His journeys in search of Ibn Battutah have also been turned into a major BBC television series. For the past twenty-five years his home has been the Yemeni capital San'a, where he lives in a tower-house on top of the ancient Sabaean city and next door to the modern donkey market. You can find out more about him at www.mackintosh-smith.com
Rory MacLean

Rory MacLean has known three Berlins: West Berlin, where he made movies with David Bowie and Marlene Dietrich; East Berlin, where he researched his first best seller STALIN'S NOSE; and the unified capital where he lives and works today. His nine books have challenged and invigorated creative non-fiction writing, and - according to the late John Fowles - are among works that 'marvellously explain why literature still lives'. He has won awards from the Canada Council and the Arts Council of England as well as a Winston Churchill Travelling Fellowship, and was nominated for the International IMPAC Dublin Literary prize. He has also written and presented over 50 BBC radio programmes and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature.
John Macleod

Born in Lochaber in 1966, John Macleod is the son of the Highland manse. After graduation he worked for BBC Highland in Inverness and currently writes a column for Glasgow's Herald newspaper. His work has featured in the Scottish and English press and in 1991 he won the trophy for Scottish Journalist of the Year. He lives in Harris in the Outer Hebrides with his small dog, Smudge.
Margaret MacMillan

Margaret MacMillan has a doctorate from St Antony's College, Oxford. Formerly Provost of Trinity College and Professor of History, University of Toronto, she is now Warden of St Antony's College, Oxford. She has written several books including PEACEMAKERS which won the BBC Four Samuel Johnson Prize, the Duff Cooper Prize and the Hessell-Tiltman Prize.
Paul Magrs

Paul Magrs (pronounced Mars) was born in the North East of England and lives in Manchester. After teaching English Literature and Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia and at Manchester Metropolitan University, he now writes full time, and has published fiction for both adults and children, including the acclaimed Brenda and Effie series set in Whitby.
Gregory Maguire

Gregory Maguire is a bestselling author who has earned rave reviews and a dedicated following for Wicked, the first novel in the Wicked Years quartet (which also included Son of a Witch, A Lion Among Men and Out of Oz), that was made into an award-winning musical. He received his doctorate in English Literature from Tufts University, and has taught at Simmons College and other Boston area colleges. He has also served as an artist-in-residence at the Blue Mountain Center, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum and the Hambridge Center. Gregory has lived in Dublin and London, but now makes his home near Boston, Massachusetts, with his partner, their two sons and daughter.
Andrew Mango

Andrew Mango was born in Istanbul. He complemented his knowledge of Turkish by studying Persian and Arabic at the School of Oriental Studies in London. From 1947 to 1986 he worked at the BBC, retiring as Head of South European and French Language Services. During his retirement he continued to study and write on Turkish affairs. He died in 2014.
Philip Mansel

Philip Mansel is a historian of France and the Ottoman Empire. He has written histories of Constantinople and nineteenth-century Paris, as well as biographies of Louis XVIII and the Prince de Ligne. Six of his books have been translated into French. He writes for the Art Newspaper, the Times Literary Supplement and The Spectator. While writing LEVANT, he lived in Beirut and Istanbul. In 2012 Philip Mansel was awarded the prestigious London Library Life in Literature Award in recognition of the quality of both his writing and his scholarship.
Erich Maria Remarque

Erich Maria Remarque was born in Osnabruck in 1899. Exiled from Nazi Germany, and deprived of his citizenship, he lived in America and Switzerland. The author of a dozen novels, Remarque died in 1970.
Alex Marshall

Alex Marshall is a pseudonym for Jesse Bullington, acclaimed author of several novels in different genres including The Sad Tale of the Brothers Grossbart and The Enterprise of Death. He lives in Florida.
George R.R. Martin

George R.R. Martin published his first story in 1971 and quickly rose to prominence, winning four HUGO and two NEBULA Awards in quick succession before he turned his attention to fantasy with the historical horror novel FEVRE DREAM, now a Fantasy Masterwork. Since then he has won every major award in the fields of fantasy, SF and horror. His magnificent epic saga A Song of Ice and Fire is redefining epic fantasy for a new generation, and is the basis for the hit HBO series GAME OF THRONES. George R.R. Martin lives in New Mexico.Read more at http://sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/martin_george_r_r
Gail Z. Martin

Gail Martin is the popular author of the Chronicles of the Necromancer series. She lives in Charlotte, North Carolina with her husband and three children.
A. Lee Martinez

A. Lee Martinez was born in El Paso, Texas. At the age of eighteen, for no apparent reason, he started writing novels. Thirteen short years (and a little over a dozen manuscripts) later, his first novel, Gil's All Fright Diner, was published. His hobbies include juggling, games of all sorts, and astral projecting.
John Matthews

John Matthews has written widely on Arthurian, Celtic and Mythic London respectively. He is best known as an authority on the history and myths of King Arthur, as well as Druidry, Faery Lore and Celtic Shamanism. He is the author of 90 books including the New York Times bestseller Pirates. He has worked as an historical advisor on films such as King Arthur (2004) and is currently developing a number of feature length scripts and documentaries.
Jeremy McCarter

Jeremy McCarter wrote cultural criticism for New York magazine and Newsweek before spending five years on the artistic staff of the Public Theater, where he created, directed, and produced the Public Forum series. He served on the jury of the Pulitzer Prize for Drama, and is writing a book about young American radicals during World War One. He lives in Chicago.
Mary McCarthy

Mary McCarthy (1912-1989) was a well-known novelist, critic, journalist and memoirist. Her most famous novel is THE GROUP.
Chris McGrath

Chris McGrath was racing correspondent at the Independent for seven years and has won multiple awards, including racing journalist of the year. This is his first book.
Fiona McIntosh

Fiona McIntosh was born in Brighton, and has lived in England, Ghana and France. She currently resides in Adelaide, South Australia, with her husband and two sons.
Juliet E. McKenna

Juliet McKenna previously worked as a bookseller but is now a full-time writer. She lives with her family in Oxfordshire.