index
Our Authors
Tom Macaulay

Tom Macaulay has lived on four continents, working - among other things - as a journalist, a truck driver, an archaeologist and, for about seven sweaty hours, as a bush firefighter in New South Wales. Born in London, he settled for twenty years in Australia and holds dual Australian/British citizenship. Tom Macaulay is married and lives in Oxford. He has no children but does have a half share in a black Labrador called James.
Ross MacDonald

Ross Macdonald (1915-1983) was the pseudonym of Kenneth Millar who was born in California and educated in Canada and at the University of Michigan, where he also taught. In 1938 he married the writer Margaret Millar. He served in the United States Naval Reserve from 1944 to 1946. He published his first novel, The Dark Tunnel, in 1944 and his first Lew Archer story, The Moving Target, in 1949. He became a Grand Master of the Mystery Writers of America in 1973.
Marianne Macdonald

Marianne Macdonald was born in Canada, moved to England in her twenties and never left. She is a former university professor, actress and playwrite, and still is a children's author. She is married to antiquarian bookseller Eric Korn and has two sons. She lives in North London with her husband and dogs, and travels extensively.
John D. MacDonald

John D MacDonald (1916-1986)MacDonald was born in Sharon, Pa, and educated at the Universities of Pennsylvania, Syracuse and Harvard, where he took an MBA in 1939. After war service in the Far East he wrote hundreds of stories for the pulps and over seventy novels, including the 21 in the Travis McGee sequence.
Giles MacDonogh

Giles MacDonogh is the author of a number of highly acclaimed works of German history,including A Good German, Frederick the Great, The Last Kaiser, and After the Reich, and he is also translator of the bestselling The Hitler Book. He writes for newspapers in Britain and Europe, including theFinancial Times, the Guardian and The Times and contributes to magazines around the world.
Kinley MacGregor

Writing as Sherrilyn Kenyon and Kinley MacGregor, she is the NEW YORK TIMES bestselling and award-winning author of several series: the Dark-Hunters; the Lords of Avalon; and the League. She lives with her husband and three sons in Nashville, Tennessee.
Tim Machin

Tim has read all the Harlan Coben titles for Orion Audiobooks and ONE FALSE MOVE won a goldaward at the 2004 SPOKEN WORD AWARDS. He has worked extensively in theatre, both in Canada and in the UK, ranging from LOOK BACK IN ANGER to MACBETH. He appeared in THE COMPLETE MILLENNIUM MUSICAL (ABRIDGED) touring with the Reduced Shakespeare Co. He featured in THE YOUNG INDIANA JONES CHRONICLES on film.
Donald MacKenzie

Donald MacKenzie (1908-1994) was born in Ontario, Canada, and educated in England, Canada and Switzerland. For twenty-five years MacKenzie lived by crime in many countries. 'I went to jail,' he wrote, 'if not with depressing regularity, too often for my liking.' His last sentences were five years in the United States and three years in England, running consecutively. He began writing and selling stories when in American jail. 'I try to do exactly as I like as often as possible and I don't think I'm either psychopathic, a wayward boy, a problem of our time, a charming rogue. Or ever was.'He had a wife, Estrela, and a daughter, and they divided their time between England, Portugal, Spain and Austria.
Amy MacKinnon

Amy MacKinnon, a former congressional aide, is a freelance writer whose commentaries have appeared in theSeattle Times, Boston Globe, Boston Herald, Patriot Ledger and on National Public Radio and This American Life. She lives in Marshfield, Massachusetts with her husband and their three young children.
Tim Mackintosh-Smith

Tim Mackintosh-Smith's first book, YEMEN: TRAVELS IN DICTIONARY LAND won the 1998 Thomas Cook/Daily Telegraph Travel Book Award and is now regarded as a classic of Arabian description. His books on Ibn Battutah's adventures in the old Islamic world and in India have all received huge critical acclaim. LANDFALLS was awarded the Oldie Best Travel Award in 2010 and the Ibn Battutah Prize of Honour by the Arab Centre for Geographical Literature. His journeys in search of Ibn Battutah have also been turned into a major BBC television series. For the past twenty-five years his home has been the Yemeni capital San'a, where he lives in a tower-house on top of the ancient Sabaean city and next door to the modern donkey market. You can find out more about him at www.mackintosh-smith.com
Rory MacLean

Rory MacLean has known three Berlins: West Berlin, where he made movies with David Bowie and Marlene Dietrich; East Berlin, where he researched his first best seller STALIN'S NOSE; and the unified capital where he lives and works today. His nine books have challenged and invigorated creative non-fiction writing, and - according to the late John Fowles - are among works that 'marvellously explain why literature still lives'. He has won awards from the Canada Council and the Arts Council of England as well as a Winston Churchill Travelling Fellowship, and was nominated for the International IMPAC Dublin Literary prize. He has also written and presented over 50 BBC radio programmes and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature.
John Macleod

Born in Lochaber in 1966, John Macleod is the son of the Highland manse. After graduation he worked for BBC Highland in Inverness and currently writes a column for Glasgow's Herald newspaper. His work has featured in the Scottish and English press and in 1991 he won the trophy for Scottish Journalist of the Year. He lives in Harris in the Outer Hebrides with his small dog, Smudge.
Margaret MacMillan

Margaret MacMillan has a doctorate from St Antony's College, Oxford. Formerly Provost of Trinity College and Professor of History, University of Toronto, she is now Warden of St Antony's College, Oxford. She has written several books including PEACEMAKERS which won the BBC Four Samuel Johnson Prize, the Duff Cooper Prize and the Hessell-Tiltman Prize.
James Macpherson

JAMES MACPHERSON played DCI Jardine in Taggart for sixteen years, and has acted on stage in plays as diverse as The Taming of the Shrew and ART by Yasmina Reza. He has presented a regular books programme for Radio Scotland - for which he has interviewed Ian Rankin. He won a Spoken Word Gold Award for his reading of Strip Jack, Crimefest Audible UK Sounds of Crime Awards for Exit Music, Doors Open and Standing in Another Man's Grave and has narrated all the Ian Rankin Rebus books. James lives in Glasgow.
Paul Magrs

Paul Magrs (pronounced Mars) was born in the North East of England and lives in Manchester. After teaching English Literature and Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia and at Manchester Metropolitan University, he now writes full time, and has published fiction for both adults and children, including the acclaimed Brenda and Effie series set in Whitby.
Gregory Maguire

Gregory Maguire is a bestselling author who has earned rave reviews and a dedicated following for Wicked, the first novel in the Wicked Years quartet (which also included Son of a Witch, A Lion Among Men and Out of Oz), that was made into an award-winning musical. He received his doctorate in English Literature from Tufts University, and has taught at Simmons College and other Boston area colleges. He has also served as an artist-in-residence at the Blue Mountain Center, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum and the Hambridge Center. Gregory has lived in Dublin and London, but now makes his home near Boston, Massachusetts, with his partner, their two sons and daughter.
G.M. Malliet

G M Malliet attended Oxford University and holds a graduate degree from the University of Cambridge. She now lives in the US.
Andrew Mango

Andrew Mango was born in Istanbul. He complemented his knowledge of Turkish by studying Persian and Arabic at the School of Oriental Studies in London. From 1947 to 1986 he worked at the BBC, retiring as Head of South European and French Language Services. During his retirement he continued to study and write on Turkish affairs. He died in 2014.
Philip Mansel

Philip Mansel is a historian of France and the Ottoman Empire. He has written histories of Constantinople and nineteenth-century Paris, as well as biographies of Louis XVIII and the Prince de Ligne. Six of his books have been translated into French. He writes for the Art Newspaper, the Times Literary Supplement and The Spectator. While writing LEVANT, he lived in Beirut and Istanbul. In 2012 Philip Mansel was awarded the prestigious London Library Life in Literature Award in recognition of the quality of both his writing and his scholarship.
Phillip M. Margolin

Phillip Margolin was a prominent criminal defence attorney in Oregon before turning to full-time writing. He has been an Edgar nominee and Ed Harris starrred in the movie of The Last Innocent Man.