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Our Authors
Rory MacLean

Rory MacLean has known three Berlins: West Berlin, where he made movies with David Bowie and Marlene Dietrich; East Berlin, where he researched his first best seller STALIN'S NOSE; and the unified capital where he lives and works today. His nine books have challenged and invigorated creative non-fiction writing, and - according to the late John Fowles - are among works that 'marvellously explain why literature still lives'. He has won awards from the Canada Council and the Arts Council of England as well as a Winston Churchill Travelling Fellowship, and was nominated for the International IMPAC Dublin Literary prize. He has also written and presented over 50 BBC radio programmes and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature.
John Marco

John Marco has worked in various industries including aviation, computers and home security. He now writes full time. He lives on Long Island in the USA.
Ari Marmell

Ari Marmell has an extensive history of freelance writing, which paid the bills while he worked on improving and publishing his fiction.
George R.R. Martin

George R.R. Martin published his first story in 1971 and quickly rose to prominence, winning four HUGO and two NEBULA Awards in quick succession before he turned his attention to fantasy with the historical horror novel FEVRE DREAM, now a Fantasy Masterwork. Since then he has won every major award in the fields of fantasy, SF and horror. His magnificent epic saga A Song of Ice and Fire is redefining epic fantasy for a new generation, and is the basis for the hit HBO series GAME OF THRONES. George R.R. Martin lives in New Mexico.Read more at http://sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/martin_george_r_r
Elizabeth May

Elizabeth May is a professional photographer who has worked for an array of magazines and publishing houses. She is currently living in Edinburgh where she is studying anthropology while writing her next novel.You can learn more at www.elizabethmaywrites.co.uk or by following @_ElizabethMay on twitter.
Mark Mazower

Mark Mazower is a Professor of History at Princeton University and has recently been appointed Professor of History at Birkbeck College, London.
Paul McAuley

Paul McAuley (Born 1955)Paul James McAuley was born in Gloucestershire on St George's Day, 1955. He has a Ph.D in Botany and worked as a researcher in biology at various universities, including Oxford and UCLA, and for six years was a lecturer in botany at St Andrews University, before leaving academia to write full time. He started publishing science fiction with the short story "Wagon, Passing" for Asimov's Science Fiction in 1984. His first novel, 400 Billion Stars won the Philip K. Dick Award in 1988, and 1995's Fairyland won the Arthur C. Clarke and John W. Campbell Awards. He has also won the British Fantasy, Sidewise and Theodore Sturgeon Awards. He lives in London.You can find his blog at: http://www.unlikelyworlds.blogspot.com
Colleen McCullough

Colleen McCullough is a neuroscientist by training, but best known for her many works of fiction. She and Sir Roden Cutler have been designated two of Australia's one hundred Living National Treasures. She lives in Norfolk Island with her husband, Ric Robinson.
Patricia A. McKillip

Patricia A. McKillip (1948 - )Patricia Anne McKillip was born on February 29th, 1948, in Salem, Oregon. She is the acclaimed author of many fine fantasy novels for children and adults, including The Forgotten Beasts of Eld and Ombria in Shadow - both of which won the World Fantasy Award - The Sorceress and the Cygnet, Winter Rose and Harpist in the Wind, which was shortlisted for both the Hugo and World Fantasy Awards.
Suzanne McLeod

Suzanne Mcleod started writing after years working in retail management, and published her first novel THE SWEET SCENT OF BLOOD, in 2008, beginning the SPELLCRACKERS.COM series. She lives with her husband and rescue dogs in Bournemouth.You can learn more at www.spellcrackers.com, or by following @SuzanneMcLeod on twitter.
Charles Messenger

Charles Messenger was a Regular officer in the Royal Tank Regiment. He then left the army to take up a career as a military historian and defence analyst. His second career has proved hugely successful, and he has published a large number of books, mainly concentrating on the two World Wars.
Walter M. Miller

Walter M. Miller Jr (1923- 1996) grew up in the American south. He enlisted in the Army Air Corps a month after Pearl Harbor and spent most of the war as a radio operator and gunner, participating in fifty-five combat sorties over Italy and the Balkans, including the assault on Monte Cassino. After the war he studied engineering before turning to writing. A Canticle for Leibowitz won a Hugo, and his only other novel, Leibowitz and the Wild Horsewoman was published posthumously.
Karen Marie Moning

Karen Marie Moning is the # 1 New York Times bestselling author of 12 novels, including the Rita-award winning Highlander novels and the internationally bestselling urban fantasy Fever series. Her books have been published in 21 languages, and her events draw fans from all over the world.
Michael Moorcock

Michael Moorcock (1939-)Michael Moorcock is one of the most important figures in British SF and Fantasy literature. The author of many literary novels and stories in practically every genre, his novels have won and been shortlisted for numerous awards including the Hugo, Nebula, World Fantasy, Whitbread and Guardian Fiction Prize. In 1999, he was given the World Fantasy Life Achievement Award; in 2001, he was inducted into the SF Hall of Fame; and in 2007, he was named a SFWA Grandmaster. Michael Moorcock is also a musician who has performed since the seventies with his own band, the Deep Fix; and, as a member of the prog rock band, Hawkwind, won a gold disc. His tenure as editor of New Worlds magazine in the sixties and seventies is seen as the high watermark of SF editorship in the UK, and was crucial in the development of the SF New Wave. Michael Moorcock's literary creations include Hawkmoon, Corum, Von Bek, Jerry Cornelius and, of course, his most famous character, Elric. He has been compared to, among others, Balzac, Dumas, Dickens, James Joyce, Ian Fleming, J.R.R. Tolkien and Robert E. Howard. Although born in London, he now splits his time between homes in Texas and Paris.
Wendy Moore

Wendy Moore is a freelance journalist and author. Her first book, THE KNIFE MAN, won the Medical Journalists' Association Consumer Book Award in 2005 and was shortlisted for both Saltire and the Marsh Biography Awards. Her second book, WEDLOCK, has been highly acclaimed in reviews and was chosen as one of the ten titles in the Channel 4 TV Book Club. HOW TO CREATE THE PERFECT WIFE was published to rapturous reviews on both sides of the Atlantic.
Geoffrey Moorhouse

Geoffrey Moorhouse was ¿one of the best writers of our time¿ (Byron Rogers, The Times), ¿a brilliant historian¿ (Dirk Bogarde, Daily Telegraph) and ¿a writer whose gifts are beyond category¿ (Jan Morris, Independent on Sunday). He wrote over twenty books, on subjects ranging from travel and spirituality to cricket and rugby league. In 1982 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature. His To the Frontier won the Thomas Cook Award for the best travel book of its year in 1984. More recently he concentrated on Tudor history, notably with THE PILGRIMAGE OF GRACE and, in 2005, GREAT HARRY'S NAVY. He died in November 2009.
David Morgan

David Morgan was awarded the DSC for his services in the Falklands War. He left the forces in 1991 and now flies commercial jets for Virgin Airways. A dedicated aerobatic pilot, he regularly flies at air shows.
Richard Morgan

Richard Morgan was, until his writing career took off, a tutor at Strathclyde University in the English Language Teaching division. He has travelled widely and lived in Spain and Istanbul. He is a fluent Spanish speaker.
John Morris

John Morris was the first professional historian to undertake a comprehensive assessment of the scattered evidence concerning the infant years of England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland, their influence on each other and their relationship with Europe. The Age of Arthur is now the classic account of the British Isles from the fourth to the seventh centuries. Senior Lecturer in Ancient History at University College, London, the late Dr John Morris founded the journal Past and Present in 1952 and was its first editor. He initiated a major new edition of the Doomsday Book and, with A.H.M. Jones, the Prosopography of the Later Roman Empire. His last book, Londinium: London in the Roman Empire, was published in 1982.
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