Greg Clydesdale - Group

Greg Clydesdale



Greg Clydesdale lectures in the Department of Business Management at Lincoln University, Christchurch, New Zealand. He is the author of three books: Entrepreneurial Opportunity, Human Nature, and Waves of Prosperity. His articles have been published in a wide range of academic journals such as Prometheus, Creativity Research Journal, Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics and Entrepreneurship and Regional Development.
Books currently available by this author

Date published: New > Old

Robinson

The Art of Business

Greg Clydesdale
Authors:
Greg Clydesdale

When we look at Chinese history for a guide to business, we commonly reach for Sun Tzu's The Art of War, but that is a military text. It focuses on an enemy, not a trading partner, and it certainly doesn't mention customers and their role in strategy.To come to terms with Chinese commerce, we don't need to know the Art of War. We need to know the art of business. This book explains Chinese business in history: its practices, values and achievements. As we explore business through time, we discover the strategies which enabled Chinese merchants to become rich and gain insights into how Chinese business evolved, and continues to evolve. The Art of Business goes beyond the Silk Road, Marco Polo and the opium trade to examine how the many different Chinese businesses made money. It asks how merchants mastered the spatial and temporal dimensions of the market and built substantial wealth in doing so. It explores the commercial revolutions that occurred in the Tang and Song dynasties and the late Ming, and reveals business practices carried into the Ching dynasty. It explores salt merchants, the porcelain industry, Huizhou and Shanxi merchant groups, and Howqua, who became the world's richest man. The evolving nature of world commerce will place new demands on tomorrow's businesses. By examining the past, we can better understand the future in which China will once again stand like a giant.

Robinson

Waves of Prosperity

Greg Clydesdale
Authors:
Greg Clydesdale

When the Venetian merchant, Marco Polo, first arrived in Dynastic China he was faced with a society far advanced of anything he had encountered in Europe. The ports were filled with commodities from all over the eastern world, while new technology was driving the economy forward. It would take another 400 years before European trade in the Atlantic eclipsed the Pacific markets.From China's phenomenally successful Sung dynasty (c. AD 960-1279), Cargoes reveals the power of the Mughals merchants of Gujarat, who built an empire so powerful that, even in the 17th century, the richest man in the world was a Gujarat trader. It was not until the opening up of the spice routes and the discovery of South American gold that medieval Iberia came to the fore. It was only then that the Atlantic Empire of the west came to dominate world trade, first the Dutch Republic in the seventeenth century, then the British Empire in the age of the Industrial Revolution, American supremacy in the twentieth century, and the development of post-war Japan. Along the way Greg Clydesdale looks at the parallel lives and ideas of merchants and explorers, missionaries, kings, bankers and emperors. He shows how great trading nations rise on a wave of technological and financial innovation and how in that success lies the cause of their inevitable decline.